When The Warranty Runs Out

There’s an old saying about warranties that goes something like this :

“As soon as the warranty expires, that’s when things break down.”

This, of course, is not always the case. Some things perform beautifully well beyond the life of a warranty. Some things, however, do not. For me, sadly, this was true. I noticed my vehicle running rough a little while back while accelerating. It wasn’t too bad, but being a 2017 model, I was a bit worried that it was a serious problem starting. I was was concerned that it wasn’t just normal wear and tear for a vehicle barely three years old. I was due for a safety/emissions inspection this month, so I had them check on this issue as well. As is my luck, things got bad fast. The “check engine” light came on as they were trying to diagnose the issue and a code for “fuel injector-cylinder 4” came up. The light wasn’t on when I drove it there, but came on during testing. Seems like a strange coincidence. The garage I use does not do fuel injector work and recommended I take it to a dealer as they believed it was likely covered by warranty anyway. And so I did.

After running diagnostics on the vehicle, they determined that I had a faulty fuel injector that needed to be replaced as it was causing my engine to misfire while accelerating. They then quoted me a price. I was a little confused about why they were telling me I had to pay for an engine component which should be covered by my warranty. I asked why my powertrain warranty didn’t cover it since it is a vital power component that delivers fuel to the engine. They said that powertrain warranties do not cover fuel injectors, but a basic bumper-to-bumper warranty would cover it. When I brought it in for service, I was at just under 38,000 miles. My bumper-to-bumper warranty expired at 36,000 miles. Had I brought it in a couple of months ago, I would have saved myself the $500 it cost to repair the issue.

This was not the first time I thought I had protection, only to find out I was mistaken. I used to have another warranty in my life. It made me feel safe and secure knowing that I had complete protection against tragedy and evil in the world. It was religion. It covered me from top to bottom, inside and out from now into eternity. No matter what happened to me in this life, I was covered. I had a bumper-to-bumper warranty that protected me regardless of what came my way. There was no expiration for this warranty…or so I thought. This product of religion, as with any other product, comes with fine print and legal jargon.

When you believe and follow the rules of religion (in my case, Christianity) you are covered and all is well. When bad things come your way, your warranty covers you…at least emotionally…uh…sometimes. You have to believe it. If you are a Christian and you lose a job, your warranty states that it is part of God’s plan and that you just need to remain faithful. You may not see the upside in this life, but it will all make sense in the next. If you lose a loved one, again, it is part of God’s plan. There is a lesson to be learned from it and you are still guaranteed to have protection and relief from your grief…even if you don’t feel like you do.

As long as you believe that the warranty is doing what it says it will do, you will always feel comfort having it. You feel invincible knowing that even if bad things happen, victory will ultimately be yours. God has your back and it’s all in writing. So what happens when your belief wavers? What happens when you start to lose faith? That’s when the exit clause you never knew was there kicks in and you’re left with the bill. God is no longer legally obligated to be part of your life. He’s free and clear to ignore you once again. He’s out.

You see, when you believe in God, he is real, he loves you and he does all sorts of wonderful things…at least that’s what you believe is happening. When you start to lose faith and question your beliefs, all of the wonderful things God does stop completely and your relationship with the Almighty dries up in an instant. Almost like they were never real to begin with. (wink, wink) The warranty only covers current, active believers. Those who lose faith are no longer covered by God’s love and affection and are no longer recognized by him whatsoever. The prayers that you were convinced were answered? Ignored. The signs in the world that pointed to the story being real? Not there. The peace and comfort from having a relationship with your creator? Gone. Instead you are left feeling alone and swindled by a salesperson who knew you would never read the fine print when you signed up.

I questioned the man from the dealership about my car’s warranty. He apologized and said there was nothing he could do. Everything he had in front of him on his computer said that I, the customer, was responsible for the bill in its entirety. Though I was sold a vehicle with a defective part, it was my responsibility to pay for its replacement. I argued with God much in the same way. I pleaded with him to give me back my faith. I argued that it was promised to me in writing that if I believed and followed, he’d be there. I argued that I did not want to lose my faith to begin with. I only wanted to grow closer to him and be a good son to my heavenly father. I argued that if I was asking to believe and to know him that he should wrap his arms around me and take me back. I was given nothing in return for my efforts. The church was no help either. They just pointed me to the Bible and told me to read the contract again.

Whether it’s a car or a religion, when you are sold a bad product and are told to just deal with it, you feel like a fool for placing your trust in another. You feel angry. You feel like the protective coverage you were promised should be honored and when it’s not, you get unbelievably frustrated. When your warranty expires just before your car has issues, it’s maddening. You feel like they must know just about when these parts start to fail and write the term length accordingly. The same with religion. Religions don’t set term lengths, but they word things in a way that no matter what happens (or when), nothing is covered. A loss of faith is not their problem. It’s yours. The fine print clearly indicates that blind faith is required to ensure coverage. Free-thinking and logic voids the contract and religion is no longer required to do anything for you.

What about extended warranties to cover the unforeseen? Those can be purchased in installment plans with payments due each Sunday in a collection plate. There is still nothing covered, but it might make you feel a little bit better. So many people know it’s a ripoff, but they are afraid of what might happen if they don’t buy it.

17 thoughts on “When The Warranty Runs Out

  1. Funny thing, even though my warranty states: ’til death us do part, and: In sickness and in health, I often wake up and feel like my personal fuel injectors are on the blink, and I’m pretty sure I am solely responsible for their maintenance.
    *sigh*

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Car troubles happen and are to be expected. Cars are a necessity and the risks related to owning one are rather reasonable when weighing the good against the bad. Religions are not necessary and therefore the risks related to them are unreasonable and completely avoidable.

      There oughta be a religious lemon law.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. No extended warranties for me either.

      I bought a road hazard plan for some tires as a young lad. Was driving on an unfamiliar back road and kinda went sideways a little on a small wooden bridge in a blind curve. Back tire went flat. Took it in to get my replacement tire, confident in my warranty, only to find they would not honor it because the puncture was ever so slightly lower than the tread on the tire.

      Never invested in any extra warranties since. If they are going to take your money, then refuse the claim, what the hell good is the warranty? They will weasel out of it and leave you double screwed.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. “Free-thinking and logic voids the contract and religion is no longer required to do anything for you.” That right there is probably why religion never really took with me. Nothing the preacher ever said regarding the babble, ever made logical sense. I’d be sitting there thinking wtf? And the rest of the congregation was going “amen” in unision. I could not keep leaving my intellectual integrity at the door because societal expectations indicate you should have a religion. That and I have never seen so many hypocrites as I have seen sitting in church pews. Add it all up and it just lost its appeal to me.

    $500? Dealer shop labor is insane. Fuel injectors really aren’t that difficult to install. It likely took them all of thirty minutes to do the job. You pull the fuel rail and there are the injectors. Remove the wiring clip that sends the signal to the injector, remove the bolt that holds it down, pop it out, lightly lube the o ring on the new injector, and pop it in.

    Leaving religion is way tougher than installing a fuel injector, but probably 1000 times more taxing on the psych. Especially for those who have invested a lot of time and effort in the scam. I applaud all who can pull free from its clutches.

    Getting your intellectual freedom back has got to be more rewarding than religion ever was or could be. It never ceases to amaze me that so many people are so happy, having sold out their integrity for… well what exactly?

    I like the warranty analogy, I have long thought religion is selling an afterlife insurance policy that never pays off, nor can it prove that it does, despite you religiously handing them the premium (tithe) twice on Sunday and sometimes on a Wed. Start getting reciepts folks! šŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    1. When your mind tells you something’s wrong, something’s wrong. Red flags exist for a reason. Churches tell you to ignore them and to just have faith. Only in religion are we asked to push aside our better judgement and blindly follow. In all other instances, we are encouraged to trust the experts, use our minds and follow the evidence.

      Yeah, $500 seemed rather high. Over $300 of that was labor. Oh well. Life goes on.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. No extended warranties for me either.

    I bought a road hazard plan for some tires as a young lad. Was driving on an unfamiliar back road and kinda went sideways a little on a small wooden bridge in a blind curve. Back tire went flat. Took it in to get my replacement tire, confident in my warranty, only to find they would not honor it because the puncture was ever so slightly lower than the tread on the tire.

    Never invested in any extra warranties since. If they are going to take your money, then refuse the claim, what the hell good is the warranty? They will weasel out of it and leave you double screwed.

    Like

  4. Ah warranties. You’re essentially getting no benefit from it unless something goes wrong, otherwise you’re paying for nothing. Even then, you may find that it doesn’t cover you as well as you’d thought, unless you read and decipher all the fine print. For some things, having a form of insurance is obviously a great idea, I tend to stay away from ‘warranty extensions’ though, bit of a scam.

    When it comes to buying a physical product, at least a warranty can save you in some way. With Christianity, I liken it to buying a warranty for and paying for future repairs for a car that doesn’t actually exist.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. True, but according to believers, this car is the most beautiful and awe-inspiring vehicle in all of existence. No one’s ever seen it of course, but wonderful stories exist regarding it so it must be real. Not only is it real, it’s got a different design for each and every believer. Whatever features you want, it’s got ’em. Don’t like some of the features others say it has? Get rid of them and create in your mind…er…have faith I mean, that those features do not exist. It’s got everything you want and nothing you don’t want. The only limit is your imagination.

      Liked by 2 people

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